Customer Service, Kayaks, and the T.W.R.A.
Jun25

Customer Service, Kayaks, and the T.W.R.A.

A lake-side lesson in credibility.  Written by Nate Brown and Jim Quiggins. “The unspoken.”  It’s not only a feature of awkward prayer gatherings, but it can also be the most important element in customer service transactions.  An outstanding resolution requires so much more then answering the surface level question.  Oftentimes the best hope an analyst has of getting to the root cause is by perceiving the unspoken need.  If the customer has carried an emotional burden with them to the call, the analyst’s job is not only to resolve, but to heal.  This concept was recently personified by an unlikely source in Long Hunter State Park. I (Nate) love Kayaking.   Add a fishing pole to the equation, and I am a very happy man.  Such was the case early Saturday morning on the beautiful Couchville Lake just outside of Nashville.  The weather was outstanding – and I was even catching some nice fish.  My good fortunate took a surprising turn, however, as I became engulfed in the wake of a Tennessee Wildlife and Resource Agency (TWRA) vessel.  There were two agents standing on the boat, and one of them meant serious business.  His frantic yelling echoed across the otherwise silent lake.  Once my distress receded, I could hear him urgently demanding to see my life jacket.  A life jacket?  In a kayak?  Clearly this person had no idea how I’d been doing this for 12+ years and had never needed a life jacket.  A defensive tone took shape as I explained how not only did I not have a flotation device, but I did not need one.  As expected, the agent threw the book at me – taking a messianic tone as he articulated the special regulations for Couchville lake and the dangers involved. I was not even close to caring what he said.  My goal was to internalize my anger and shut up while I awaited inevitable punishment. It was at this moment that our interaction took an astonishing turn.  Instead of reaching for his ticket book, the agent began unbuckling the straps of his own life jacket.  He removed it and held it out as a gift.  His expression changed from that of a disciplinarian to a concerned friend. The realization washed over me fast and strong.  This man was not out here to punish minor violators, but rather to keep people safe and protect them.  The gesture communicated his purpose so clearly…making me see how foolish I was to have been defensive.  The agent had won my full loyalty and trust by showing that he cared about me as a person. This is how great...

Read More