Why Your Quality Management Program Stinks
Jul18

Why Your Quality Management Program Stinks

Tips for creating a customer-centric quality management program.   When implemented well, a Quality Management program has the potential to revolutionize both the agent and the customer experience.  The sad reality is that most QM programs do more harm than good.  According to the “Best Practices in Quality Monitoring and Coaching” whitepaper by Dr. Jon Anton and Anita Rockwell agents expressed these feelings in regards to a poorly implemented QM process: I am being policed I feel like “big brother” is watching me They are only trying to catch me doing something wrong It’s no wonder the turnover rate in service centers is so high if this is the typical environment.  Alternatively, when QM programs were implemented well agents experienced the following: I respect my coach and appreciate it when she shows me examples of ways to do things better I look forward to my weekly coaching sessions because it shows that my supervisor really cares about my success I enjoy monitoring my own calls; it is amazing to see what I can improve How much better is that!?  Clearly, not all Quality Management programs are created equal.  Avoiding these four common pitfalls will steer you away from “big brother” and create a process appreciated by agents, leaders, and customers alike.   Reason #1 – Leadership Built the Program in a Vacuum A helpful quality program is designed to serve the agents and make them better.  With this in mind, agents should be involved from the very beginning to actively participate in the design and objectives.  It’s so easy as leaders to create a program to fit our needs, and then proceed to unveil the new mandatory accomplishment to a captive audience.  Instead, create a “QM Committee” comprised of both leaders and front line representatives.  Engagement will be much higher when agents have skin in the game.   Reason #2 – You Focus on Scores and not Behaviors I knew we had a problem with our quality program when an agent was setting up his goals and said “I want to achieve ‘x’ score.”  How does an agent achieving ‘x’ score help the customer?  QM is all about coaching and enhancing behaviors.  If you find that discussions about quality revolve around scores received and not about behaviors to improve, there is a major problem.  Your scorecard is a big part of this.  If you have a 10+ question scorecard with either pass/fail or a complicated grading scale, it’s going to be about the score no matter what you tell the agents.  Alternatively, design your form to reflect what really matters; continual improvement.  Check out the 3 question scorecard recommended...

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Creating Quality Customer Service Interactions With DiSC
May19

Creating Quality Customer Service Interactions With DiSC

  Using DiSC in a customer service context to enhance both the customer and the agent experience. There is a plethora of training options available to service leaders who are looking to enhance the communication skills of their agents.  Having had exposure to many of these, DiSC is my top choice with the most significant impact.  Having now studied DiSC and received my credentials as a certified facilitator, there is no mystery why the tool is so great for a customer service environment.  This post will introduce you to the basics of DiSC theory; explore how it enhances communication skill for agents, as well as recommending next steps to start using DiSC with your team. The DiSC Model of Behavior was first introduced by Dr. William Moulton Marston in 1928 (yes, the same guy who created the “Wonder Woman” comics).  His theory proposed that the expression of emotions could be grouped into four original categories – Dominance (D), Inducement (I), Submission (S), and Compliance (C).  With countless iterations and improvements over the years, DiSC has become a reliable and widely recognized training tool. While on the surface it may appear to be just another test for basic self-awareness, this is not at all like the “What’s Your Patronus?” quiz on Facebook.  The assessment will help by identifying an individual’s primary communication tendencies and potential weaknesses.  When well facilitated, DiSC is all about learning how to become more flexible as a communicator- rather than providing validation and further entrenching yourself into default behaviors.  Another wonderful aspect of DiSC is how it’s applicable to both customer and internal communications. DiSC for Improved Customer Communication When you pause to consider, it is really quite remarkable what an agent is able to do each day.  Within seconds, the analyst must ascertain the communication style of the customer and construct their message accordingly.  You have customers that want the bottom line as quickly as possible (D), others that love to be educated with laborious details (C), and still others that just love to chat about personal things for twenty + minutes (i).  When the agent has a solid understanding of DiSC, they will be able to better classify their audience and customize their message for the best result.  In other words: Using DiSC, your agents will form a better connection with customers a higher percentage of the time. DiSC for Improved Internal Communication Not only will DiSC improve customer communication, but also internal interactions.  One of the chief benefits for leaders is developing well-balanced, high performing teams.  While all four communication styles have valuable attributes, they also have significant shortcomings.  However, when a team has...

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Customer Service at Sea
May01

Customer Service at Sea

Customer experience lessons enhanced by the open ocean. With all the trouble in the “friendly skies” lately, many travelers are considering vacation transportation alternatives.  One such creative option is to take to the water aboard Carnival Cruise Lines.  Having just disembarked from our families’ third cruise vacation, I can safely say that Customer Service is alive and well on the emerald seas.  It’s mind-blowing to consider all the work that goes in behind the scenes to create an effort-free vacation for the guests aboard.  Carnival has a bit of a reputation in the industry as being the “party boat,” however from my experience they are simply very good at accommodating all types of passengers (spring-breakers included). When you’re stuck on a ship for seven days, there’s bound to be at least one moment when you find yourself at guest services.  Mine came as we were waiting for dinner and I noticed someone had left their purse in a public area.  I returned the purse to guest services where an exceptionally kind gentleman named Chaimongkon showed a great deal of gratitude for the action performed.  As I was filling out a form, an older gentleman abruptly grabbed the purse off the desk, muttered something about it being his wife’s, and scowled at both of us.  The rudeness of the man left Chaimongkon and I in momentary shock.  Later that evening, I returned to my room to find a handwritten note from Chaimongkon thanking me for returning the purse and a gift of two drink vouchers.  His kindness turned a sour moment into a memorable service experience.  This highlights just a few examples of what makes Carnival agents so good at their uniquely challenging jobs: The emotional intelligence of the agent to witness the rudeness of another guest, and then putting forth the effort to make it right   The ability of a front-line agent to make an executive decision, and provide a monetary gift as an extension of goodwill The timeliness and logistics by which he made these things happen One of the most powerful things about the guest experience is the consistency.  Chaimongkon fit right in with his shipmates – all of whom held themselves to this same standard.  And it was not just at the guest services desk either….both my daughters favorite crew member was “Waterslide Walter” who made their time in the water playground an absolute blast.  The entire dining team blew us away.  Despite a grueling all day and most of the night schedule, they went above and beyond on every detail. By this point, the service professional in me came out and I had to...

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Speaking The Language Of CX Value
Mar06

Speaking The Language Of CX Value

How to foster a customer-centric mindset in a dollars-driven reality. For six years, I’d held a Customer Service job with essentially one objective: make everyone around me happy, and make customers happy as a consequence.  It was perfect for my gregarious, people-pleasing personality.  The year 2015, however, brought with it a role change and a game-changing truth: businesses are more than just smiles, free food, and birthday celebrations.  As it happens, most companies exist to make money. Moving from a Customer Service role into a professional services organization caused a significant mental evolution.  The all-important “C-Sat” (Customer Satisfaction Rate) suddenly took back stage to a far more demanding metric…revenue.  While this transition was very disorienting at first, a customer-centric mentality once again helped me find my way.  After all, happy customers and revenue are very closely related. Now finding myself back in a Customer Service role, my perspective is greatly broadened.  Having been forged in the fires of a customer-centric mentality, and now understanding the revenue generating side of the business, I can make better decisions.  Many things can drive better customer experience in the short term, but may ultimately be detrimental to the business in the end.  Adding the “revenue reality check” taught me a new language – the language of enterprise value.  By finding opportunities to enhance the customer experience, while also enhancing the bottom line, CX leaders will find far fewer barriers to impacting change. It’s our responsibility as CX leaders to be a powerful voice for the customer.  However, our ability to perform in this function is greatly enhanced when we also understand the objectives of the larger organization.  Viewing the world through the lens of the customer is vital, but you will lose focus and credibility if this is the only perspective you have.  You must bring narratives together in order to find truth and tell the right story.  Enterprise value is the language of the executive.  Learn to speak it, or become stuck between customer needs and organizational understanding.  Using statics such as these from InsightSquared will bring your narrative out of the hypothetical “touchy-feely” realm and give you credibility in associating CX initiatives to the bottom line:     Are you a Customer Service leader looking to speak the language of enterprise value?  Start with these simple actions: Solve a problem that’s not (directly) your problem – Understand the challenges that your sales and marketing leaders are experiencing and find a way for customer service to be involved in the solution.  Customer service can nearly always make a positive impact on sales and marketing challenges.  Helping the organization achieve a more consistent...

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The Customer Service Vision Statement
Feb13

The Customer Service Vision Statement

I know what you may be thinking.  Yet another meaningless corporate raw-raw statement that will be forgotten in a week!?  I’m with you.  Two years ago, I would have been in the same state of mind – but before you do your best Judge Judy eye roll and surf on, I challenge you to give the Customer Service Vision Statement a chance.  There are few things this remarkably simple that pack such a huge ROI potential for our teams. It was an ICMI workshop by the one and only Jeff Toister that first turned me on to the concept of a Customer Service Vision.  Since that time, the truth of his statements have taken root and evolved into a new mindset for me.  This is not a rewording or a replacement for your company’s vision statement….quite the opposite in fact.  In many ways, it’s like a completion. Our most powerful motivation lever as leaders is to create meaningful work tied directly to the company’s purpose.  Sadly, according to CX luminary Scott McKain, two thirds of an organization’s employees has no idea what makes their organization unique.  It’s no wonder why company vision statements are often distant and irrelevant to what actually transpires in the life of an employee.  A Customer Service Vision Statement is your opportunity to bridge this gap, and channel purpose into everything from quality management, to coaching conversations, to rewards and recognition. Hopefully the why is now clear.  Next up, we have the what and the how.  I’ll break down our service vision at UL EHSS and offer tips on how to create your very own.   Our Customer Service Vision: “Supporting our customers and each other in a manner that’s effortless, accurate, and friendly.” That’s it.  You may be thinking “how silly to write a 700+ word blog about a 14 word statement.”  Well, I’m a silly guy.  I also believe the best vision statements are short enough to actually remember.  Let me unpack this statement briefly, as it will help your thought process as you go about creating your own. “Supporting our customers and each other” – The key phrase here is “each other.”  We sometimes push a customer focus to the point where we blind ourselves to the simple fact that Customer Service is a team sport.  When a culture is established where agents go out of their way to help each other, your ability to assist customers increases exponentially.  Make the privilege of serving one another a big deal. “Effortless” – For our demographic, great customer service is all about facilitating resolutions quickly and easily.  When we can get our administrators back...

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